Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

  1. #11

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    Pete,
    I leave the socks in a 5 gal pail with lid at each job site. They are marked with the appropriate label "used oil waste" and I reuse them when servicing the next time. If their waste hauler happens to come between my visits, they'll take the container, and I start over with new ones. I cannot haul these used socks on our trucks, as they are hazardous waste, and the fine is steep if stopped by the commercial unit of our state's DOT. I know this sounds like I'm splitting hairs, but until you've had a DOT stop, you have no idea how far they crawl up your rear. The socks are relatively inexpensive and I let the managers at the stores know that if they have a oily spill of some sort, to use the sock to absorb the mess, then call me ASAP. They can also be wrung out for extended use.
    Mike Schoeben
    A-1 PRESSURE WASHING, LLC
    Serving the Twin Cities Metro area since 2000
    763-300-7128 / Champlin, MN

    http://www.a-1pressurewashing.com

  • #12

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    Some great info Mike. I am learning stages now and all this kind of info helps

    Thank you

    Jeff

  • #13

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    I know this might sound crazy but it works, I have used "expanding foam" in a can from places like home depot.... It works great around storm drains.. dries in mins.. and pops right up when your done
    Daniel Hopson
    Cleaner Image Mobile Pressure Washing
    Serving all East Tennessee And S W Virginia

    http://www.cleanerimagepw.com

  • #14

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    I know this might sound crazy but it works, I have used "expanding foam" in a can from places like home depot.... It works great around storm drains.. dries in mins.. and pops right up when your done
    I really like the idea but, I'm pretty sure your local enforcement officer would have a problem with it. Any residue left after 'popping" it would likely find its way into the storm drain, and they don't like that Also, I don't know if they would consider the foam an acceptable barrier to prevent accidental release? Usually the drain must be totally covered to comply. Foam would be alot easier to apply than heavy sand or water berms and such for directing water where you want it to go..... something to look into
    Mike Schoeben
    A-1 PRESSURE WASHING, LLC
    Serving the Twin Cities Metro area since 2000
    763-300-7128 / Champlin, MN

    http://www.a-1pressurewashing.com

  • #15

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Mike View Post
    I really like the idea but, I'm pretty sure your local enforcement officer would have a problem with it. Any residue left after 'popping" it would likely find its way into the storm drain, and they don't like that Also, I don't know if they would consider the foam an acceptable barrier to prevent accidental release? Usually the drain must be totally covered to comply. Foam would be alot easier to apply than heavy sand or water berms and such for directing water where you want it to go..... something to look into
    Mike, There is residue left behind the only thing left is a very very small part of the foam which can be scuffed up with your foot and the wind will blow it away.. as far as it being "acceptable" in Tennessee it is... there are no laws yet describing what I have to use to stop the water entering the drain.. just that the waste water better not end up their..
    If a sand filled "dam" is ok...the foam has to be because the foam actually bonds to the surface preventing any thing entering the drain...
    Daniel Hopson
    Cleaner Image Mobile Pressure Washing
    Serving all East Tennessee And S W Virginia

    http://www.cleanerimagepw.com

  • #16

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    there are no laws yet describing what I have to use to stop the water entering the drain.. just that the waste water better not end up their..
    Good point Daniel. I'm just playing Devil's advocate here, and from experience. If you get checked, and some day you will, they find all sorts of weird stuff to dog you about. I believe Larry Hinckley posted in another thread about how recovery equipment suppliers, waste haulers, etc., have these regulators ears. This means that they don't want us using simple common sense solutions, they want us to use their methods, and equipment. Total BS in my book, but it is what it is . I have to admit, the foam is a brilliant idea, and I'm definitely going to test it out. A can of foam is way lighter than a sand snake or drain cover.

    I've been told that duct tape and plastic is acceptable, and told it wasn't. This just points to the fact that there are NO set, or standardized methods on how to achieve compliance. As always, something is better than nothing. It would be great if the UAMCC and other advocates for our industry could provide the state agencies with a set of BMP's they could adopt and hand down to regulators. Until this happens, we will have wildly different rules to abide by.

    On a side note, I was doing some research yesterday, and came across a budget document for a MN agency (Clean Water Council of the MPCA)that infers that they are increasing the budget for monitoring activities, from 2.1mil to 14.6mil through 2010.
    Mike Schoeben
    A-1 PRESSURE WASHING, LLC
    Serving the Twin Cities Metro area since 2000
    763-300-7128 / Champlin, MN

    http://www.a-1pressurewashing.com

  • #17

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    If I am not mistaken the garbage disposal companies have certification for hazardous waste. The debris can be thrown into the dumpsters when your done washing however the socks you will need to dispose of at a different location. My area has drop off locations for used oil and should be capable of taking in those types of items.
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Mike View Post
    Pete,
    I leave the socks in a 5 gal pail with lid at each job site. They are marked with the appropriate label "used oil waste" and I reuse them when servicing the next time. If their waste hauler happens to come between my visits, they'll take the container, and I start over with new ones. I cannot haul these used socks on our trucks, as they are hazardous waste, and the fine is steep if stopped by the commercial unit of our state's DOT. I know this sounds like I'm splitting hairs, but until you've had a DOT stop, you have no idea how far they crawl up your rear. The socks are relatively inexpensive and I let the managers at the stores know that if they have a oily spill of some sort, to use the sock to absorb the mess, then call me ASAP. They can also be wrung out for extended use.

  • #18

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    Yes, the filtered stuff (debris) can be put in the dumpster, but the socks cannot. They usually have their people who pickup the used cooking oil take the oil socks for a nominal fee. Rules for used oil waste are pretty strict in MN, so I don't take any chances.
    Mike Schoeben
    A-1 PRESSURE WASHING, LLC
    Serving the Twin Cities Metro area since 2000
    763-300-7128 / Champlin, MN

    http://www.a-1pressurewashing.com

  • #19

    Default Re: Washwater recovery tools & techniques

    Auto parts stores that take used oil and filters will take the socks around here.
    Danny Bates
    Lone Star Power Cleaning
    Arlington, TX
    817-681-9239
    danny@lonestarpowercleaning.com
    www.lonestarpowercleaning.com
    Lone Star Power Cleaning on Facebook

  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Single Sign On provided by vBSSO