Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 65

Thread: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

  1. #51

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    prac∑ti∑ca∑ble
    ˈpraktikəbəl/
    adjective





    fea∑si∑ble
    ˈfēzəbəl/
    adjective








    SEC. 103 [33 U.S.C. 1253] Interstate Cooperation and Uniform Laws

    (a) The Administrator shall encourage cooperative activities by the States for the prevention,
    reduction, and elimination of pollution, encourage the enactment of improved and, so far as
    practicable,



    (l) Practicable means of treating municipal sewage, and other waterborne wastes to implement the
    requirements of section 201 of this Act;


    (1)(A) not later than July 1, 1977, effluent limitations for point sources, other than publicly owned
    treatment works, (i) which shall require the application of the best practicable control technology


    (7) to the extent practicable, the applicant has established a schedule of activities designed to
    eliminate the entrance of toxic pollutants from nonindustrial sources into such treatment works;


    Factors relating to the assessment of best practicable control technology currently
    available to comply with subsection (b)(1) of section 301 of this Act shall include consideration of
    the total cost of application of technology in relation to the effluent reduction benefits to be
    achieved from such application,



    From the beginning Congress authored the Act with the charge to do what we can to clean up the environment to the maximum extent practicable.

    It is not practicable or feasible to rob Peter to pay Paul.

    As an illustration it wouldn't be "practicable" to have each farmer force his cows to reside in a custom built enclosure with air scrubbing filtration costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to eliminate cow flatulence.

    It is also not "practicable" to require pressure washers using $15k in powerwashing equipment to purchase $50k in reclaim vaccuum equipment to eliminate discharges that can easily be eliminated through inexpensive gravity filtration right on the ground.

    It is not "practicable" to force contractors to double the emissions by having to use double the small engines needed to complete a job just to pick up the water.

    It is not "practicable" to cause cleaning water to have to be picked up by a reclaim company tripling the cost of the cleanup and causing more emissions to transport the water.

    Now that we are not longer represented to the authorities by those who stand to profit when these things are mandated, we can start the long process of showing regulators the net positive effect we, cleaners, have on the environment......in a practicable way.....as Congress intended in the Clean Water Act.
    Sonitx
    702-358-7477





    Free FREE Events www.uamccevents.com

  • #52

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    That is a good point about having a company come and pick up the wash water.

    I looked into this for a special project here where I live to show how ridiculous the cost would be to do things the way that some vendor up in north Texas told them they had to do things and to show them how it can be done legally without all that nonsense and had them call the right people to verify I was telling them the truth.

    To haul away wash water would require a vacuum truck at $80.00 per hour plus an additional man in the truck (their policy of 2 guys in the truck for safety reasons) at the rate of an additional $30.00 per hour.

    They are timing the job from the time they leave their yard to the time they return with a 4 hour minimum.

    There is also the cost to dispose of the wash water at the rate of $0.50 per gallon, no minimum or maximum.

    Then there is the truck wash out cost to clean the tank at the rate of $225.00 to be steam cleaned and sanitized and neutralized by their shop so there is no chance of cross-contamination and no possible reaction with anything else they haul later that day or week.

    This is the average price of several companies that deal with waste water hauling/environmental cleanups so one is higher and one is lower than the other 2 companies.

    When you do the math of a full day of cleaning concrete at 5.5gpm's for 8 hours (8 hour day but 30 minutes setup and 30 minutes teardown off the clock) minus 1 hour lunch and a couple of 15 minute breaks so 1.5 hours not washing. Let's do the math 6.5 hours washing at 5.5gpm (5.5 x 60 min x 6.5 hours) is 2535 gallons which will fit in the average vacuum truck plus you will have water absorbing into the concrete and a lot evaporating also before it reaches the lowest point of the property.

    I usually work a lot more hours per day but this is just an example to show the math and ridiculousness from the info from a vendor up in north Texas.

    They did not tell me who the company was and I did not ask but it was obvious that that vendor was lying to them and giving them a lot of mis-information that I proved to this company and showed them the truth and had them call some people to verify the truth and they got pissed at that vendor for lying to them and almost causing them a fortune to get a simple large job done.

    So, we would have a vacuum truck on site for 8 hours but add in the 20 minute drive there and back but they deduct 30 minute lunch if they leave for lunch, if they stay there then lunch is on the clock as they will alternate between the 2 guys so one is watching the job at all times for safety reasons and company policy. So, 8 hours and 40 minutes they round up to the nearest half hour or hour) at $80 per hour and the additional guy at $30 per hour will be $110.00 per hour x 9 hours will be $990.00

    Now add in the truck wash fee of $225.00

    Now add in the cost of disposing the wash water at $0.50 per gallon x 2535 but let's say that a few hundred gallons absorbs and evaporates just for argument's sake, so $0.50 x 2235 gallons will be $1267.50 for disposal of the wash water.

    Oops, I forgot to add in the time to drive to the disposal place which is about 30 minutes each way so that is another hour of $110.00 added to the bill, and that is no waiting hopefully, if they have to wait to dispose of the wash water, that is being charged to you, the customer.

    Ok, let's look at the bill for handling and disposing of the wash water per day as this is a large concrete slab that needs to be washed but will take several days.

    $ 990.00 for the vacuum truck and helper per day
    $ 225.00 for the washout of the vacuum truck each day
    $1267.50 for the disposal of the wash water each day
    $ 110.00 for the additional time to go to and from the disposal facility each day

    Total is: $2592.50 but that is not including the actual washing of the concrete, this is just to take away the wash water as recommended by the north Texas vendor, who does not even work here, has no clue of the job, has no clue of what is needed to do the job, that vendor is just regurgitating info that some idiot said or is just making up lies and other mis-information because he has no idea of the job or what it entails.

    For a customer to pay this amount of money per day besides the cost to wash the concrete is going to be out of reach for a lot of customers and I would not ask them to pay that kind of money ever, that is why I talked to them about another method of dealing with the wash water that is legal and they called to check on my information and found me to be telling them the truth and actually impressed that I knew so much about this kind of thing as the other contractors did not mention any of this and when asked about the wash water they told them that they would have to look into it.

    I know these numbers as I have done some of these projects on occasion and know the numbers from past experience, prices hardly ever go down, they usually go up as it is with the economy, prices usually only go up for most things.

    I was able to do the concrete washing job with common sense and just brought some oil socks for added benefit but this job had no oil stains, just mold, mildew, algae and dirt so I had a vacuum and sump pump sending the non-oily wash water into the grassy area and the dirt we just shoveled into the grass with the permission of the owner so there was no big song and dance needed with this job, no hauling away wash water or other nonsense as was told to them by a north Texas vendor who did not have any clue whatsoever.

    This is a perfect example of knowing the CWA (actually have read it and understand it, not just saying I did and acting like an expert afterwards), knowing what you can and cannot do and was able to do the job affordably for the customer and in their budget.

    You don't need a huge investment to do the right thing most of the time in this industry but there are people out there that will lie to you and give you mis-information but it is up to you to know the truth and you will find a lot of truth here on UAMCC and over on PWI.

    Thanks for what you are doing to help contractors here Tony. I hope some open their eyes and see how much you are doing for everyone and I hope that people will read the CWA so they will understand what it is about so they will not be lied to or misled as there is still a lot of that going around out there.

  • #53

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Shelton View Post
    I'm going to start a series here doing my best to put all that legal mumbo jumbo we've seen screens and screens of into simple language that everyone except for some garage cleaners can understand.

    Kristopher Pettit reported this post and said that I might have been referring to Jim Gamble.

    Please allow me to revise it:

    I'm going to start a series here doing my best to put all that legal mumbo jumbo we've seen screens and screens of into simple language that everyone except for some who are uneducatable, like Jim Gamble, the western environmental director for the PWNA can understand.

    I hope that is more satisfactory to Mr. Pettit.
    Sonitx
    702-358-7477





    Free FREE Events www.uamccevents.com

  • #54

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Kris and Tony Shelton--this thread is about the CWA and educating. Please keep the context of your private emails off here. Thanks

    Doug Rucker-Owner/Operator
    Certified NCE Instructor
    We own and operate a School for Pressure Washing, Roof Cleaning, and Soft Washing http://www.pressurecleaningschool.com
    Check out our ONLINE PRESSURE WASHING SCHOOL with over 160 videos https://www.pressurecleaningschool.c...ashing-school/
    Free FREE Events www.uamccevents.com

  • #55

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Rucker View Post
    Kris and Tony Shelton--this thread is about the CWA and educating. Please keep the context of your private emails off here. Thanks
    Sorry Doug. You are right. This is not the place. My mistake.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk 2
    Sonitx
    702-358-7477





    Free FREE Events www.uamccevents.com

  • #56

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    I am not sure how many years ago there was an issue over in Georgia, and another city but I don't remember the cities.

    Many contractors got together as the city was in a very bad drought but the contractors got together and helped out in that city, explained to them the CWA and what it really meant and talked with the city to help keep the contractors working for safety and sanitary reasons, not for other reasons which in the city's eyes would not be a good reason for cleaning.

    I was not able to go there and help out but does anyone have information whether in electronic files, handouts or other information on what was said to the city so that the contractors can keep on working even in the drought?

    I hate to alter the direction of this great thread but in a way it does involve the CWA as that is part of the education for the city to help keep contractors working.

    If anyone has this or similar information, please post links to it or email me files or scan the brochures or handouts if possible.

    This is very important information that can help contractors in many cities as not only Texas is in a serious drought but also parts of Georgia and other states.

    I will start a separate thread later on here and over on PWI about this.

    Thank You.

  • #57

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Chappell View Post
    I am not sure how many years ago there was an issue over in Georgia, and another city but I don't remember the cities.

    Many contractors got together as the city was in a very bad drought but the contractors got together and helped out in that city, explained to them the CWA and what it really meant and talked with the city to help keep the contractors working for safety and sanitary reasons, not for other reasons which in the city's eyes would not be a good reason for cleaning.

    I was not able to go there and help out but does anyone have information whether in electronic files, handouts or other information on what was said to the city so that the contractors can keep on working even in the drought?

    I hate to alter the direction of this great thread but in a way it does involve the CWA as that is part of the education for the city to help keep contractors working.

    If anyone has this or similar information, please post links to it or email me files or scan the brochures or handouts if possible.

    This is very important information that can help contractors in many cities as not only Texas is in a serious drought but also parts of Georgia and other states.

    I will start a separate thread later on here and over on PWI about this.

    Thank You.
    That also happened in Raleigh NC probably about the same time. It really had nothing to do with the CWA but more about water restrictions hurting Contractors making a living. A group got together and worked with Officials to eliminate the problem.

  • #58

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Guy, do you have any info about it or who was involved?

    I might be in that situation very soon and was trying to find people that were involved and had info on what was said in the meetings.

    Thanks.

  • #59

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Chappell View Post
    Guy, do you have any info about it or who was involved?

    I might be in that situation very soon and was trying to find people that were involved and had info on what was said in the meetings.

    Thanks.
    Chris, I'll do what I can...Celeste was the spearhead on that, she is probably the most knowledgeable on this subject. It was also my understanding that Contractors used "Reuse" water form the wastewater plants in the area.

  • #60

    Default Re: Environmental Law for Pressure Washers - The Clean Water Act - What the heck is it?

    Thanks Guy, any help is appreciated.

    Do you have Celeste's phone number? I called the number that I have but it is not working.

    Thanks again.

  • Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Single Sign On provided by vBSSO